Customers running Windows 7 have reported running into issues when attempting to install an Intel AHCI driver from the DVD or CD, as a part of deploying Microsoft’s latest iteration of the Windows client.

According to the software giant, users reported coming across an error message after they pressed F6 in order to load a vendor provided AHCI controller driver.

“The Intel Express Chipset SATA AHCI controller (E:\1046…\iaAHCI.inf) device driver could not be installed. Contact your vendor for an updated driver,” is an example of the information displayed to end users.

The Redmond company revealed that the issues can occur during the Windows 7 installation process, and only when customers attempt to install the AHCI driver from a DVD or CD media. More »

Intel motherboards are used in the majority of PCs and notebooks sold in recent years, and they contain a surprising amount of technology. It’s common to find HD audio, graphics, networking, and disk controllers on the motherboard.

Whether you’re using the original PC manufacturer image or a clean install of Windows, chances are one or more of those drivers are out of date. Tracking down updates manually is confusing, to say the least. Fortunately, Intel has now automated the process with a web-based scanner that inventories your current drivers and offers to install the most recent updates.

To start, open Internet Explorer and visit the Intel Driver Update Utility page. (This page also works with Firefox and Chrome, but I recommend those options only if you already have Java installed on your PC and are confortable downloading and installing a Java applet. On my computers, I avoid anything that requires Java.) Click the button labeled “Check your system for the latest updates.” More »

Windows Setup could not configure Windows on this computer’s hardware,” is an error message that some customers attempting to install Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 received before the deployment failed.

Microsoft confirmed the issue and also offered details on the source of the error message.

According to the Redmond company, the problem involves scenarios in which users try to install either Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008 R2 to an advanced 512-byte emulation (512e) format disk.

The drive also needs to be configured in such a way as to emulate RAID disk functionality in order for the error message to be presented, the software giant explained. More »

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Microsoft confirmed this issue, and noted that IE9 is not to blame, but that at fault is an incompatibility between the next generation IE browser and old hardware.

It appears that reports of poor performance for IE9 came from users that compared the speed of the new browser with that of older versions of Internet Explorer. The older releases of IE were faster especially on webpages that had complex graphics.

The issue is related to the HTML5 performance enhancements built into Microsoft’s next iteration of IE.

IE9 brings to the table hardware acceleration, leveraging the computer’s GPU (graphics processing unit) in concert with the DirectX APIs in Windows 7 and Windows Vista SP2. More »