1. Click on “Start” in the bottom left hand corner of screen

2. Click on “Run”

3. Type in “command” and hit ok

You should now be at an MSDOS prompt screen.

4. Type “ipconfig /release” just like that, and hit “enter”

5. Type “exit” and leave the prompt

6. Right-click on “Network Places” or “My Network Places” on your desktop.

7. Click on “properties”

You should now be on a screen with something titled “Local Area Connection”, or something close to that, and, if you have a network hooked up, all of your other networks.

8. Right click on “Local Area Connection” and click “properties”

9. Double-click on the “Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)” from the list under the “General” tab

10. Click on “Use the following IP address” under the “General” tab

11. Create an IP address (It doesn’t matter what it is. I just type 1 and 2 until i fill the area up).

12. Press “Tab” and it should automatically fill in the “Subnet Mask” section with default numbers.

13. Hit the “Ok” button here

14. Hit the “Ok” button again

You should now be back to the “Local Area Connection” screen.

15. Right-click back on “Local Area Connection” and go to properties again.

16. Go back to the “TCP/IP” settings

17. This time, select “Obtain an IP address automatically”

18. Hit “Ok”

19. Hit “Ok” again

20. You now have a new IP address

With a little practice, you can easily get this process down to 15 seconds.

This only changes your dynamic IP address, not your ISP/IP address. If you plan on hacking a website with this trick be extremely careful, because if they try a little, they can trace it back


  1. UncoolDude says:

    I don’t get it. I’m not really sure what’s so great about taking these steps…you can just disconnect/reconnect, or use the “repair” option from your connection’s right-click menu, and in my experience, it does the same thing. At any rate, consumer routers will just reassign your address in order of availability, and if no other devices have joined or parted since you disconnected, you’ll end up with the same internal IP.

    Not too familiar with business/corporate/institutional routers. I believe similar rules would apply, although you have a better chance of getting a different internal IP address, since there are more computers/users connecting/disconnecting from larger networks.

  2. sagar says:

    my speed is 56kb/s, i want to increase my speed what i do?

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