You can customize the appearance of a Command Prompt window, changing its size, font, and even colors. And you can save these settings independently for each shortcut that launches a Command Prompt so that you can make appropriate settings for different tasks.

To customize a Command Prompt window, you make settings in the Properties dialog box that you can reach in three ways:

  • Right-clicking on a shortcut for a Command Prompt provides the Properties option. Changes you make here affect all future Command Prompt sessions launched from that particular shortcut.
  • Clicking the Control menu icon in a Command Prompt window offers access to the Properties dialog box. (If Command Prompt is running in full-screen mode, press Alt+Enter to switch to window display.) Changes you make here affect the current session. When you leave the properties dialog box, you’ll be given the option of propagating your changes to the shortcut from which this session was launched. If you accept, all future sessions launched from that shortcut will also use the new settings.
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To test what sleep modes are enabled on your system, do the following:

In Win7, click Start, All Programs, and Accessories. Right-click Command Prompt and select Run as administrator. In the Command Prompt window, type powercfg -a and press the Return key.

There are six power modes, S0 (fully on) through S5 (fully off). Labels such as standby and sleep are used interchangeably by different vendors, so are not a precise guide to identifying the mode you’re using. To save power, you might use any of the following:

step 1: is closest to fully up and running — the PC simply powers down the hard drive and monitor. Hit a key, and the system is instantly ready for work. More »

Windows allows you to use scaling to increase the size of text and other items on the screen. When you use scaling in this way, Windows magnifies the size of text and UI elements to the scale you choose. Each account on a computer has a separate setting for scaling.

You can specify the scaling to use for text and UI elements by following these steps:

1. In Control Panel, click Appearance And Personalization.

2.Under the Display heading, click Make Text And Other Items Larger Or Smaller.

3.The default scaling options allow you to choose a 100-percent scale (the default), a 125-percent scale, or a 150-percent scale. To use one of these scaling options, make a selection, and then click Apply. More »

Each time you install a version of Windows, it rewrites the MBR to call its own boot loader. If you install Windows 7 (or Windows Vista) as a second operating system on a PC where Windows XP is already installed, the Windows boot menu incorporates the options from the older boot menu. But if you install a fresh copy of Windows XP (or Windows Server 2003) on a system that is already running Windows 7, you’ll overwrite the MBR with one that doesn’t recognize the Windows 7 boot loader. To repair the damage, open a Command Prompt window in the older operating system and run the following command from the Windows 7 DVD, substituting the letter of your DVD drive for d here:

d:\boot\ bootsect.exe /nt60 all

When you restart, you should see the Windows 7 menu. To restore the menu entry for your earlier version of Windows, open an elevated Command Prompt window and type this command:

bcdedit /create {ntldr} –d “Menu description goes here”

Substitute your own description for the placeholder text, being sure to include the quotation marks. The next time you start your computer, the menus should appear as you intended. More »

Dragging files between folders with Windows Explorer is fine for some tasks, but when it comes to heavy-duty file management you need a better tool. If you’re willing to do a little typing in exchange for power and flexibility you can’t get with Windows Explorer, get to know Robocopy.

Robocopy (the name is short for Robust File Copy) was introduced with the Windows Server 2003 Resource Kit and is included in all editions of Windows 7. Its many strengths include the ability to copy all NTFS file attributes and to mirror the contents of an entire folder hierarchy across local volumes or over a network. If you use the right combination of options, you can recover from interruptions such as network outages by resuming a copy operation from the point of failure after the connection is restored.

The Robocopy syntax takes some getting used to. If you’re familiar with the standard Copy and Xcopy commands, you’ll have to unlearn their syntax and get used to Robocopy’s unconventional ways. The key difference is that Robocopy is designed to work with two directories (folders) at a time, and the file specification is a secondary parameter. In addition, there are dozens of options that can be specified as command-line switches. The basic syntax is as follows: More »