The Windows 7 Disk Management tool provides a simple interface for managing partitions and volumes. Here’s an easy way to shrink a volume to free up space so you can create a new partition on your disk.

To shrink a basic volume, simple volume, or a spanned volume:

1. Open the Disk Management console by typing diskmgmt.msc at an elevated command prompt.

2. In Disk Management, right-click the volume that you want to shrink, and then click Shrink Volume.

3. In the field provided in the Shrink dialog box, enter the amount of space by which to shrink the disk.

The Shrink dialog box provides the following information: More »

The Windows 7 Disk Management tool provides a simple interface for managing partitions and volumes.

Here’s an easy way to create a new partition on your disk.

1. Open the Disk Management console by typing diskmgmt.msc at an elevated command prompt.

2. In Disk Management’s Graphical view, right-click an unallocated or free area, and then click New Simple Volume. This starts the New Simple Volume Wizard. (Note: If you need to create unallocated space, see the Tip Easily Shrink a Volume on a Windows 7 Disk for information on how to do this.)

3. Read the Welcome page and then click Next.

4. The Specify Volume Size page specifies the minimum and maximum size for the volume in megabytes and lets you size the volume within these limits. Size the partition in megabytes using the Simple Volume Size field and then click Next. More »

Check the hardware.

Hardware? Yes! No operating system can be better than the hardware on which it’s installed, and older systems are prone to age-related problems. One often-overlooked problem is dust buildup, which can cause chips and drives to overheat and malfunction. These hardware errors can masquerade as software problems, causing you to waste time troubleshooting the wrong thing.

It’s easy to clean your PC. Consult my how-to article, “Getting the grunge out of your PC.” (It’s a few years old, but still completely apt.) While you have your PC’s case open, make sure that all plug-in cards and socketed chips are fully seated and all cables firmly connected. More »

With the advent of Windows 7, Microsoft made it possible for Virtual Hard Disks to be used with a machine even though they weren’t connected to a parent operating system, virtual machine technology or hypervisor. This is, of course, valid for both Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2, since the two platforms share the same core, and made possible scenarios such as Boot from VHD. A guide available as a free download from Microsoft offers a comprehensive insight into virtual hard disks (VHDs) in Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2, simplifying procedures such as deployment and configuration for IT professionals.

“The virtual hard disk file format (.vhd) specifies the format of a file that represents a virtual hard disk. To use VHDs on Windows Server 2008 and previous versions of Windows, you must install the Hyper-V role, Microsoft Virtual Server, or Windows Virtual PC. However, with Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2, you can create, configure, and boot physical computers from VHDs without a virtual machine or hypervisor,” Microsoft informed. More »

If you have used Windows Vista, you must be knowing about the in-built option to partition hard drives. Similar to that, Windows 7 too come with a built-in facility to create, resize and delete partitions from a HDD, which means you can shrink or extend the partitions.

The Disk Management utility is capable of shrinking and expanding partitions and it does not require any 3rd party utilities. This step-by-step tutorial helps you create, resize or delete a partition in Windows 7.

1. Go to Start -> Right Click on Computer -> Manage

2. Computer Management windows will open. Click on Storage -> Disk management

3. Select the Drive you want to partition. Right click on the drive and click on Shrink Partition.

4. It will query for the available disk space and then you will then be presented with a window showing you the Size of the Hard drive and the total amount available to Shrink. Enter in the amount you would like to shrink. This will be the size of the new partition. It can’t be more than the amount available to you and remember that Approx 1000 Mb = 1 GB More »