Customers running Windows 7 have reported running into issues when attempting to install an Intel AHCI driver from the DVD or CD, as a part of deploying Microsoft’s latest iteration of the Windows client.

According to the software giant, users reported coming across an error message after they pressed F6 in order to load a vendor provided AHCI controller driver.

“The Intel Express Chipset SATA AHCI controller (E:\1046…\iaAHCI.inf) device driver could not be installed. Contact your vendor for an updated driver,” is an example of the information displayed to end users.

The Redmond company revealed that the issues can occur during the Windows 7 installation process, and only when customers attempt to install the AHCI driver from a DVD or CD media. More »

Intel motherboards are used in the majority of PCs and notebooks sold in recent years, and they contain a surprising amount of technology. It’s common to find HD audio, graphics, networking, and disk controllers on the motherboard.

Whether you’re using the original PC manufacturer image or a clean install of Windows, chances are one or more of those drivers are out of date. Tracking down updates manually is confusing, to say the least. Fortunately, Intel has now automated the process with a web-based scanner that inventories your current drivers and offers to install the most recent updates.

To start, open Internet Explorer and visit the Intel Driver Update Utility page. (This page also works with Firefox and Chrome, but I recommend those options only if you already have Java installed on your PC and are confortable downloading and installing a Java applet. On my computers, I avoid anything that requires Java.) Click the button labeled “Check your system for the latest updates.” More »

I am here again with a nice tip and a free EXE to help you in tuning your system. You must have struggled a lot with ‘regedit’ to tune up your system as it really helps you to set your system settings as per your convenience and this also help your system to be faster. In this post I will be helping you to use a small installable EXE file which will help you to use the system registry files smartly and quickly, let us see that how you can use this tool for your ease.

You can see the snapshot of the System registry folder icon in your browser. This seems to be quite new to you but we have a tool which can be retrieved by clicking the download link mentioned below. Initially the only method to run ‘regedit’ on your system was to go to the RUN window and then type this keyword in the text field after your press you must have observed a separate window in which all the registry files are present in the folders and then if you want to change anything then it can be done in that same browser. More »

A new Windows Sysinternals tool available for download allows Windows 7 users to map out the system memory usage of their machines. Developed by Windows gurus Mark Russinovich and Bryce Cogswell, RAMMap 1.0 is now available for download both as a standalone utility and as a part of the Windows Sysinternals package.

RAMMap is capable of showing customers just what is happening to their physical memory, beyond anything the Task Manager is capable of doing. The utility is designed to integrate seamlessly with Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2, but also Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008.

“Have you ever wondered exactly how Windows is assigning physical memory, how much file data is cached in RAM, or how much RAM is used by the kernel and device drivers? RAMMap makes answering those questions easy. RAMMap is an advanced physical memory usage analysis utility for Windows Vista and higher,” an excerpt of the tool’s description reads. More »

While a vulnerability does exist in the latest Windows client and server platforms with Aero enabled, actually getting exploit code to work and performing successful attacks are not likely to happen. Microsoft downplayed the risk users of Windows 7 64-bit, Windows Server 2008 R2 for 64-bit systems and Windows Server 2008 R2 Itanium systems were exposed to, indicating that the new zero-day, for which details had been disclosed in the wild, was extremely hard to exploit. At the same time, the Redmond company underlined that it was not aware of any attacks targeting the flaw, or of exploit code capable of reaching execution.

Jerry Bryant, group manager, Response Communications, Microsoft, revealed that the new security hole resided in the Windows Canonical Display Driver (cdd.dll). Microsoft has already published Security Advisory 2028859, informing customers of the issue and offering advice on how to stay protected until a patch is offered. More »