A few years ago who would have thought that one day we would be running around with tiny computers in our pockets and bags and instead of hard disc drives, we would be trusting huge volumes of valuable data to titchy microchips?

Okay, so maybe it’s not such a big surprise; most of us have grow up with solid-state memory and saw it coming a fair way off, but in the dash to ditch hard drives there’s one thing we may have overlooked. Hard drives and now incredibly reliable and we usually change computers long before the drives give out.

Solid State Drives or SSDs, on the other hand do tend to have shorter lives, especially in the early days. There are a number of factors that determine an SSD’s life expectancy including how long has been powered up and the number of read-write operations. More »

Working on a slow, disorganized computer can be frustrating and it happens to the best of us. This article will give you some easy-to-follow guidelines on how to keep your computer on the right track using tools in Windows 7, Windows Vista, Windows XP, and Microsoft Office 2010.

1. Organize your folders

We all know how easy it is to dump files into the wrong folder when we’re in a hurry. But one way to make sure you keep your files organized is to remove the clutter with a filing system that makes sense for the way you use your computer. Here are a few tips to get you started:

  • Start clean : Begin by deciding which files you no longer need on your hard disk drive. More »

Microsoft has confirmed an issue for customers running Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 in which the platforms can corrupt disk volumes and lead to data loss on computers with HDDs larger than 2 terabytes (TB).

According to the Redmond company, in addition to running either Windows 7 or Windows server 2008 R2 on a machine equipped with hard disk drive with more than 2 terabytes of disk space, users also need to have the operating systems configured to save dump files to a volume on the HDD.

In this context, the results might end up upsetting customers, the software giant warned.

“Some data of the dump file is offset at a disk offset greater than the 2 terabyte address of the hard disk drive,” Microsoft informed. More »

Check the hardware.

Hardware? Yes! No operating system can be better than the hardware on which it’s installed, and older systems are prone to age-related problems. One often-overlooked problem is dust buildup, which can cause chips and drives to overheat and malfunction. These hardware errors can masquerade as software problems, causing you to waste time troubleshooting the wrong thing.

It’s easy to clean your PC. Consult my how-to article, “Getting the grunge out of your PC.” (It’s a few years old, but still completely apt.) While you have your PC’s case open, make sure that all plug-in cards and socketed chips are fully seated and all cables firmly connected. More »

If you have used Windows Vista, you must be knowing about the in-built option to partition hard drives. Similar to that, Windows 7 too come with a built-in facility to create, resize and delete partitions from a HDD, which means you can shrink or extend the partitions.

The Disk Management utility is capable of shrinking and expanding partitions and it does not require any 3rd party utilities. This step-by-step tutorial helps you create, resize or delete a partition in Windows 7.

1. Go to Start -> Right Click on Computer -> Manage

2. Computer Management windows will open. Click on Storage -> Disk management

3. Select the Drive you want to partition. Right click on the drive and click on Shrink Partition.

4. It will query for the available disk space and then you will then be presented with a window showing you the Size of the Hard drive and the total amount available to Shrink. Enter in the amount you would like to shrink. This will be the size of the new partition. It can’t be more than the amount available to you and remember that Approx 1000 Mb = 1 GB More »