Windows Setup could not configure Windows on this computer’s hardware,” is an error message that some customers attempting to install Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 received before the deployment failed.

Microsoft confirmed the issue and also offered details on the source of the error message.

According to the Redmond company, the problem involves scenarios in which users try to install either Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008 R2 to an advanced 512-byte emulation (512e) format disk.

The drive also needs to be configured in such a way as to emulate RAID disk functionality in order for the error message to be presented, the software giant explained. More »

Make USB Disk Bootable is a console based free tool which lets you create a MS DOS bootable USB drive which is created by using the system files on any windows xp PC. This bootable USB Disk is actually a MS-DOS Bootable USB Drive from the users XP source files.

Tip: Install Windows 7 From Bootable USB Drive

This free tool uses HP USB Dos Format Tool to make the USB disk bootable, if you do not have HP USB Format tool installed then it will download it from the HP Website and install it on your computer.

Note: You must accept the HP End User License Agreement during setup.

Here is the step by step procedure to do the same

Related Tip: Installing Windows XP Using A USB Flash Drive

1. Download Make USB Bootable Tool and extract the zip package in separate directory

2. Right click mkboot.cmd file and click edit to change the attributes in the config file.

3. Change USBDRV value R: to the drive letter that is been currently used by your USB Drive when you plug it in your computer.

4. Exit and Save then double click on mkboot.cmd to run this tool. More »

Removable flash memory sticks are pretty much one of the most handy little pieces of technology to come along in the last couple of years. They come in various shapes and their storage size can range from a measly 128 MB to a whopping 32 GB. And you’re not restricted by what you are able to put onto these devices either. Which got me thinking today. I am regularly installing fresh copies of Windows onto new built PCs, so I look for any way to increase the speed at which my work gets done without compromising quality, of course.

So I thought, with the speed of flash drives today, it could be possible to install Windows XP onto those PCs in a much faster time than with optical media (CD/DVD). Plus with all the motherboards I use, I always make sure that the motherboards support booting from USB as it’s a very handy feature. So I decided to look into the various guides that can be found on the Internet. Originally meant for the EEEPC, I found a guide that I was able to understand. Because of the way it was written it took me longer than 10 minutes to understand the whole procedure and I’m sure the average geek would be completely confused before they had reached the second line, simply because of the total lack of explanation on the part of the guide’s creator for those who do not usually do this kind of thing. More »

Microsoft gave computer makers a six-month extension for offering Windows XP on newly-shipped PCs. While this doesn’t impact enterprise IT because volume licensing agreements will allow IT to keep installing Windows XP for many years to come the move is another symbolic nail in Vista’s coffin.

The public reputation of Windows Vista is in shambles, as Microsoft itself tacitly acknowledged in its Mojave ad campaign.

IT departments are largely ignoring Vista. In June (18 months after Vista’s launch), Forrester Research reported that just 8.8% of enterprise PCs worldwide were running Vista. Meanwhile, Microsoft appears to have put Windows 7 on an accelerated schedule that could see it released in 2010. That will provide IT departments with all the justification they need to simply skip Vista and wait to eventually standardize on Windows 7 as the next OS for business.

So how did Vista get left holding the bag?

Let’s look at the five most important reasons why Vista failed. More »