Is your Windows Desktop dotted with files? Have you noticed that your fast computer has been running slower and slower? Do you see the hard drive light often flashing while you wait for the computer to respond to an action? To speed up your computer, clean your Windows Desktop.

How Many Files are on Your Desktop?

Each time Windows starts, operating memory is used for all files on the Desktop. If those files are Shortcuts, the total amount of memory used will be small. If however, there are several or dozens of files on the Desktop, those will use lots of operating memory, essentially for no purpose or gain.

With less memory available, the computer runs slower because it has to swap out information from operating memory to the hard drive. It does this process (called memory paging) to keep everything the user wants to do, running at the same time. More »

When you want to get detailed system information or check computer information, you can use the System Information tool (Msinfo32.exe). To access system information: click Start, type msinfo32 into the Search box, and press Enter. You can then view system summaries by selecting the System Summary node. All the configuration statistics provided are collected using the WMI service.

To browse configuration information for a remote computer:

1. Open the System Information tool.

2. Select Remote Computer on the View menu (or press Ctrl+R). This displays the Remote Computer dialog box.

3. In the Remote Computer dialog box, select Remote Computer On The Network. More »

A hotfix is available to users that have experienced problems waking up their Windows 7 machines from hibernation.

According to the Redmond company, customers running the latest iteration of the Windows client have reported issues in which they are unable to resume activity after their computer goes into hibernation.

The software giant explained that in some cases, the computer screen will dim after the users log on to resume from hibernation. This issue is related specifically to Windows 7, Microsoft stated.

“Consider the following scenario:

– You have a computer that is running Windows 7.

– You configure the power button to be used for hibernation on the computer. More »

Most existing 16-bit and MS-DOS-based programs were originally written for Windows 3.0 or Windows 3.1. Windows 7 runs these older programs using a virtual machine that mimics the 386-enhanced mode used by Windows 3.0 and Windows 3.1. Unlike on other recent releases of Windows, on Windows 7 each 16-bit and MS-DOS-based application runs as a thread within a single virtual machine. This means that if you run multiple 16-bit and MS-DOS-based applications, they all share a common memory space. Unfortunately, if one of these applications hangs or crashes, it usually means the others will as well.

You can help prevent one 16-bit or MS-DOS-based application from causing others to hang or crash by running it in a separate memory space. To do this, follow these steps: More »

1. Find bottlenecks

From what we’ve seen so far Windows 7 is already performing better than Vista, but if your PC seems sluggish then it’s now much easier to uncover the bottleneck. Click Start, type RESMON and press [Enter] to launch the Resource Monitor, then click the CPU, Memory, Disk or Network tabs. Windows 7 will immediately show which processes are hogging the most system resources.

The CPU view is particularly useful, and provides something like a more powerful version of Task Manager. If a program has locked up, for example, then right-click its name in the list and select Analyze Process. Windows will then try to tell you why it’s hanging – the program might be waiting for another process, perhaps – which could give you the information you need to fix the problem.

2. Keyboard shortcuts

Windows 7 supports several useful new keyboard shortcuts.
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