Most existing 16-bit and MS-DOS-based programs were originally written for Windows 3.0 or Windows 3.1. Windows 7 runs these older programs using a virtual machine that mimics the 386-enhanced mode used by Windows 3.0 and Windows 3.1. Unlike on other recent releases of Windows, on Windows 7 each 16-bit and MS-DOS-based application runs as a thread within a single virtual machine. This means that if you run multiple 16-bit and MS-DOS-based applications, they all share a common memory space. Unfortunately, if one of these applications hangs or crashes, it usually means the others will as well.

You can help prevent one 16-bit or MS-DOS-based application from causing others to hang or crash by running it in a separate memory space. To do this, follow these steps: More »

You can customize the appearance of a Command Prompt window, changing its size, font, and even colors. And you can save these settings independently for each shortcut that launches a Command Prompt so that you can make appropriate settings for different tasks.

To customize a Command Prompt window, you make settings in the Properties dialog box that you can reach in three ways:

  • Right-clicking on a shortcut for a Command Prompt provides the Properties option. Changes you make here affect all future Command Prompt sessions launched from that particular shortcut.
  • Clicking the Control menu icon in a Command Prompt window offers access to the Properties dialog box. (If Command Prompt is running in full-screen mode, press Alt+Enter to switch to window display.) Changes you make here affect the current session. When you leave the properties dialog box, you’ll be given the option of propagating your changes to the shortcut from which this session was launched. If you accept, all future sessions launched from that shortcut will also use the new settings.
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Make USB Disk Bootable is a console based free tool which lets you create a MS DOS bootable USB drive which is created by using the system files on any windows xp PC. This bootable USB Disk is actually a MS-DOS Bootable USB Drive from the users XP source files.

Tip: Install Windows 7 From Bootable USB Drive

This free tool uses HP USB Dos Format Tool to make the USB disk bootable, if you do not have HP USB Format tool installed then it will download it from the HP Website and install it on your computer.

Note: You must accept the HP End User License Agreement during setup.

Here is the step by step procedure to do the same

Related Tip: Installing Windows XP Using A USB Flash Drive

1. Download Make USB Bootable Tool and extract the zip package in separate directory

2. Right click mkboot.cmd file and click edit to change the attributes in the config file.

3. Change USBDRV value R: to the drive letter that is been currently used by your USB Drive when you plug it in your computer.

4. Exit and Save then double click on mkboot.cmd to run this tool. More »

You will use the following tools when you prepare images and deploy Windows Vista throughout your organization:

Sysprep This is the updated version, modified for Windows Vista.

Setup A new installation tool for Windows Vista that replaces WINNT and WINNT32.

ImageX The new command-line tool for creating WIM images.

Windows SIM A tool for creating and modifying Unattend.xml files.

PEimg The tool for customizing Windows PE 2.0 images.

Windows DS The new version of RIS, which adds the ability to deploy Windows Vista images as well as Windows PE 2.0 boot images. More »