In the past months I’ve had my fair share of time chatting with members of the IE team, over the phone and face-to-face, but I wasn’t able to meet with John Hrvatin, Lead Program Manager on Windows Internet Explorer, as I needed to be in Berlin at TechEd Europe 2010 earlier this month.

After all, there’s a lot to talk about, especially with Microsoft getting closer and closer to finalizing Internet Explorer 9.

IE9 continues to be in Beta at this point in time, and evolving toward the Release Candidate (RC) with Platform Preview 6 and 7 released since mid-September, the last of which offered to early adopters this week.

Still, I did manage to put some questions together and John was kind enough to provide the answers via email. More »

If you find yourself tripping over new Windows 7 features or missing favorite old ones, I’ve got some tips that will come to your rescue.

Lost in all the glowing Windows 7 reviews and marketing hype is the fact that not everything about Microsoft’s new OS is an unqualified success. You don’t have to use Win7 for very long before you notice one of your favorite features of earlier Windows versions is changed or missing.

But if you don’t like the default Win7 interface and the features that Microsoft prefers, no problem! A few simple tweaks can let you adjust Win7 to your own liking. Even better, some of the following tips also apply to Vista and XP.

The return of the Quick Launch toolbar

Annoyance: The latest Windows versions let you place the Quick Launch toolbar on the taskbar. From there, you can launch your favorite applications, documents, or folder windows with a single click. In Windows 7, unfortunately, Quick Launch is MIA.

In Win7, a new Taskbar combines elements of the classic Taskbar and Quick Launch toolbars into one. To be sure, many people like the new Taskbar. Al Arnston is one of several readers who suggests that Win7’s “Pin to Taskbar” feature trumps Quick Launch. But you may disagree. More »

We all use windows run prompt to launch various windows utilities like command prompt, msconfig but whenever we type a command in run prompt it gets saved in Windows as Run History as Run MRU (Most Recently Used) List.

Many of my friends gets annoyed to see recently typed commands in windows run as they do not want others to see what they had typed in run.

Today, we will tell you all the ways to clear run prompt history in Windows XP and Vista.

There two methods to clear the windows run history, the first method is via windows registry to clear windows run and second method involves a free utility MRU Blaster which lets you clear windows run history

Let’s discuss both of these methods to clear the recently typed commands in run. More »

Here’s a nifty little trick for creating a text file listing of the contents of a folder, without using any extra software. Step one is to note down the path and name of the folder concerned; if it’s a long one, click on the folder icon in Windows Explorer so that it’s displayed in the address box, then right-click on it and select Copy. Now open a command window by going to Run (XP) or Search (Vista) on the Start menu and type ‘cmd’

A DOS like window opens and at the flashing prompt type cd then a space and type in the path and name of the folder – in my example the folder is called ‘Pix’, so the first line looks like this:

cd C:\Pix

If you used the Copy trick simply right-click on the flashing prompt and select Paste.

Now press Enter and the cd (change directory) command changes the display to show the path and name of your folder, thus: More »

Normally, the blue screen of death contains a driver name, and some addresses; if you’re lucky, removing that driver will do the trick. But what if there is no driver name on the BSoD? And what if you don’t have all the skills to play with crashdumps and debuggers?

In this case, Autoruns comes to the rescue. This is a graphical tool that allows you to disable/enable drivers in a very easy way.

The strategy:

1. Boot into safe mode (since the system is crashing when you attempt to boot normally);
2. Start Autoruns, and switch to the Drivers tab;
3. Go through the list, and uncheck the drivers that are suspicious;
4. Close the program, restart and boot normally

The steps above will be repeated until the system is able to boot correctly.

When that happens, remember what were the last changes you applied, and try to enable some drivers back – until you figure out which one of them was causing the issue. More »