Windows Setup could not configure Windows on this computer’s hardware,” is an error message that some customers attempting to install Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 received before the deployment failed.

Microsoft confirmed the issue and also offered details on the source of the error message.

According to the Redmond company, the problem involves scenarios in which users try to install either Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008 R2 to an advanced 512-byte emulation (512e) format disk.

The drive also needs to be configured in such a way as to emulate RAID disk functionality in order for the error message to be presented, the software giant explained. More »

Five months after the introduction of Games for Windows LIVE Setup 3.2, Microsoft is offering customers an update, kicking the version of the client up a notch. In this regard, gamers that have been leveraging Games for Windows – LIVE are now able to download and install a new release of the app. According to the Redmond company, “Games for Windows – LIVE Setup 3.3 upgrades users to the newest version: 03.03.0024.00.” However, Microsoft has been extremely shy when it comes down to sharing details about the release.

As it was the case with the previous Build of the Games for Windows LIVE Setup, version 3.3 is designed to play nice with PCs running Windows 7; Windows Vista; Windows XP SP2 or SP3. Existing users of Games for Windows – LIVE will notice that the update is being automatically delivered to them. If they haven’t installed the upgrade already, it will be offered to them next time they run Games for Windows LIVE. More »

The Windows 7 driver store includes a small collection of drivers for legacy devices, mostly older printers, modems, scanners, infrared ports, PCMCIA controllers, and other oddball devices that don’t use Plug and Play connections. As you might suspect, Windows will not automatically set up such devices, and you’re rolling the dice if you find one of these old but still worthwhile devices and try to install an old driver.

But what if the device in question is valuable to you and can’t be easily replaced by a newer, supported one? Then by all means give it a try. Download the most recent hardware drivers you can find (ideally, for Windows XP or Windows Server 2003), and then use the Add Hardware wizard to complete the hardware setup process. Follow these steps:

1. If you’ve found a downloadable driver package or a CD that came with the device, look for a Setup program and run it. This option places the driver files on your hard disk and simplifies later installation steps.

2. Connect the new hardware to your computer. In the case of an internal device such as an add-in card, turn off the computer, add the device, and then restart. More »

Firefox 3.5 Release Candidate 2 is live and is available for download. This is the development milestone of the open source browser that will be made available to the general public. Mozilla already started serving the RC of Firefox 3.5 as soon as June 16, but the availability process is not over yet.

In fact, June 19 marks the day that the final RC bits of Firefox 3.5 are going to be served to the public. Mozilla indicated that with the development of Firefox 3.5, formerly Firefox 3.1, and codenamed Shiretoko, it has changed the traditional process of wrapping up the browser.

Historically, step seven in the development evolution involved “shipping partial updates to beta-channel users and change the beta download page to point to the new development milestone,” revealed Mike Beltzner, director of Firefox at Mozilla. “So, what’s new and exciting? We’ve realized that we can run this process in a more parallel fashion by splitting step 7 into: 7.1 ship partial updates to beta-channel users; 7.2 change the beta download page to point to the new development milestone.” More »

If you long for the good old days of XP and still have your install CD, this step-by-step guide will help you revert to Vista’s predecessor.

These days, you have to work to find a new computer that comes with XP installed. Many PC users who upgraded their XP systems to Vista are disappointed with the newer OS’s performance and other problems. In either case, as long as you have an XP installation CD, you can kiss Vista good-bye.

“Downgrading” from Vista to XP is not as difficult as you may think, but it does entail some time-consuming operations. Many online sources claim to offer techniques for reinstalling XP without having to reformat your hard disk. Based on my research, however, deleting the Vista partition and installing XP in its place is arguably the easiest approach. Moreover, this method ensures a clean install that is uncontaminated by Vista leftovers.

Note: In certain cases, you may be able to undo an XP-to-Vista upgrade, even without an XP installation CD, by following the instructions in Microsoft article 933168. The article takes a command-line approach to the XP restoration, and also requires that you have a windows.old folder on your root drive. More »