Occasionally, you might discover a client that isn’t automatically installing updates correctly. Such clients are typically identified during software update audits. To identify the source of the problem, follow these steps:

1. Determine the last time the client was updated. This can be done in two different ways—by checking the client’s registry (the most reliable technique) or, if you use Windows Server Update Services (WSUS), by checking the Reports page on the WSUS Web site.

* To check the client’s registry, open the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\WindowsUpdate\Auto Update\Results registry key. In each of the Detect, Download, and Install subkeys, examine the LastSuccessTime entry to determine when updates were last detected, downloaded, and installed. More »

Although it is currently cooking Windows 7 Service Pack 1 (SP1), Microsoft continues to ensure that the latest version of its Windows client continues to evolve even ahead of the upgrade planned for the first half of 2011.

Case in point, two application compatibility updates offered by the Redmond company to customers this week.

Accompanying the updates are two knowledge base articles, including KB 2272691 (Application Compatibility Update for Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2: August 2010).

In addition, the software giant also released KB 982110 (The QueryPathOfRegTypeLib function does not return the correct path for a 32-bit version of an application in a 64-bit edition of Windows 7 or in Windows Server 2008 R2). More »

Microsoft has warned users of the attest iteration of its Windows client and server platforms that they could experience problems related to their machines, when the OS stops responding for no apparent reason.

According to the Redmond company, the problems reported by customers do not fit any pattern, and appear to happen at random.

Fortunately enough, the software giant already has a solution for the problem available to affected customers running Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2.

“A computer that is running Windows Server 2008 R2 or Windows 7 stops responding randomly,” Microsoft stated.

“Applications or services that are running on the computer stop working correctly. Additionally, you cannot log on to the computer by using the remote desktop connection utility,” the company explained. More »

This Tips is designed to help you be more efficient and provide greater security to the computer, and your account (netID). Following these suggestions should help minimize the number of viruses and defects that infect your machine.

The computer Desktop is actually a file that grows and decreases in size, depending on your activities on the computer. Storing files and folders on the Desktop is a dangerous practice. If actual files and folders are stored on the Desktop, and the Desktop file fails, then you stand the chance of losing anything that was stored on the Desktop. Through the use of diagnostic and repair utilities, these items on the Desktop can sometime be recovered and repaired. But, in some cases, the files are lost forever. Therefore, it is important to store actual files and folders within the hard drive (C:/). If you have files and/or folders that you access frequently, you can make Aliases (Mac) or Shortcuts (PC) of the items and place the Aliases/Shortcuts on the Desktop, instead of the actual items. Aliases/Shortcuts are small files (about 15k) that point to the actual item and open it. More »

While responding to criticism over the iPhone 4’s reception issues, which Apple continues to label as inexistent, the company confirmed that a free software update would be rolled out for all iPhone users. Scheduled to arrive in “a few weeks”, the update will be made available not only for iPhone 4 users, but also for owners of an iPhone 3G or iPhone 3GS.

By posting an open letter to answer the bad PR surrounding its iPhone 4, Apple admitted that the formula it used to calculate how many bars of signal strength iPhones should display in certain circumstances was “totally wrong”.

“Our formula, in many instances, mistakenly displays 2 more bars than it should for a given signal strength,” the company said. “For example, we sometimes display 4 bars when we should be displaying as few as 2 bars,” Apple explained. “Users observing a drop of several bars when they grip their iPhone in a certain way are most likely in an area with very weak signal strength, but they don’t know it because we are erroneously displaying 4 or 5 bars. More »