Windows XP is configured to help you take care of networking. It uses the TCP/IP protocol for networking in workgroups, or what you might call small office or home networks that do not use a dedicated server.

The problem is that automatic IP addressing can be slow. When your computer boots, it has to query the network to see what IP addresses are already in use and then assign itself one. If you want to speed up the boot time a bit, consider manually assigning IP addresses to all computers on the network. This way, the network computers do not have to worry about locating an automatic IP address. Because one is manually configured, the operating system doesn’t have to spend time solving this problem. More »

You have 2 network cards, and are connected to 2 networks. You want to specify which one is used to surf the internet.

Here is how you do it on Windows. It’s comes down to an “Interface Metric”.

step1:First, right click on the network card/item that you wish to use for the internet. In this case it is the “wireless network connection 2″

step2:Here I left click once on the connection to select it, then right click to get the dialog box below. Choose properties.

step3:Then scroll down until you see Internet Protocol (TCP/IP), select it (make it blue), then click on the Properties button.

step4:Click on the Advanced button. More »

1. Click on “Start” in the bottom left hand corner of screen

2. Click on “Run”

3. Type in “command” and hit ok

You should now be at an MSDOS prompt screen.

4. Type “ipconfig /release” just like that, and hit “enter”

5. Type “exit” and leave the prompt

6. Right-click on “Network Places” or “My Network Places” on your desktop.

7. Click on “properties”

You should now be on a screen with something titled “Local Area Connection”, or something close to that, and, if you have a network hooked up, all of your other networks. More »

The process of installing Windows 7 involves a stage in which end users need to Set a Network Location. The SNL dialog window can be revisited after deployment, and the settings altered. In this context, location is key. In order to simplify the network configuration, Windows 7, just as Windows Vista before it, allows users to set up a network connection in accordance to location. The SNL dialog offers three different network locations: Public, Work and Home. What it does is that when the computer detects a network connection, options are provided for the user to help define and apply appropriate network settings automatically.

User interaction is only necessary when choosing among Home, Work or Public locations, as Windows 7 does all the heavy lifting. But you can’t even tell there’s any heavy lifting involved as the configuration process is extremely fast, and I for example, have yet to see it fail even once, after countless installs of the platform in pre-Beta, Beta, RC and pre-RTM stages.

In all fairness, the Windows 7 client comes with an additional option for network location, namely Domain. However, Domain is reserved for enterprise environments and is out of the reach of end users. The option is controlled entirely by a network administrator, users cannot opt to take advantage of Domain by themselves or alter the configuration. More »

A DNS server translates a human address like into a numerical IP address so your computer can take you to the right site. Usually, this takes a few hundred milliseconds to complete so it’s barely noticeable, but over time, these milliseconds can really build up. Also, your ISP’s DNS server isn’t always reliable as witnessed by Comcast subscribers recently when their DNS server failed, leaving customers unable to access Google and other sites. By using OpenDNS and FastCache, you can solve the two problems of reliability and speed.

OpenDNS runs a distributed network of DNS servers so using it is more reliable. It filters out bad addresses so phishers and spammers can’t direct you to their site. OpenDNS also detects typos in the URLs you enter so entering craigslist.og leads you to

A piece of software called FastCache takes care of the problem of speed. It stores the IP address that is returned by your DNS server so your computer doesn’t have to request it every time you want to go to a particular site, saving a few hundred milliseconds each time. More »