Lots of people use networks, but most people don’t have the time or inclination to become networking experts. Instead, we often rely on someone more knowledgeable to troubleshoot our network problems. But what if you don’t have someone available to help you? The Network troubleshooter in Windows 7 provides a way for anyone to diagnose and repair network problems.

Networks are complex

Networks rely on complex technology, so diagnosing the root cause of a network problem can often be a difficult task. For example, if you can’t access a website, you will see an error message, but the message might not be necessarily very helpful since it typically won’t pinpoint the exact problem. The problem could be caused by a number of issues with your computer, the web server, or the network between your computer and the web server. More »

Basic troubleshooting usually starts the same as with any other type of hardware devices. Try the following:

· Make sure that the devices are supported by your operating system and then

· Go to the manufacturer’s web site and download the latest version of software or drivers for those devices. While you’re there you might browse the site to see if there are known issues or other information for your device.

· Make sure the Bluetooth device is listed in the Bluetooth Devices Browser in the Control Panel (keep in mind that some Bluetooth devices may install a custom dialog window for their device in the control panel).

· Make sure that you’re system is up to date on any service packs and other updates for your operating system

For additional troubleshooting, browse to the page listed below for other scenarios that you may run into. More »

When you want to get detailed system information or check computer information, you can use the System Information tool (Msinfo32.exe). To access system information: click Start, type msinfo32 into the Search box, and press Enter. You can then view system summaries by selecting the System Summary node. All the configuration statistics provided are collected using the WMI service.

To browse configuration information for a remote computer:

1. Open the System Information tool.

2. Select Remote Computer on the View menu (or press Ctrl+R). This displays the Remote Computer dialog box.

3. In the Remote Computer dialog box, select Remote Computer On The Network. More »

Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI) is a key part of the Windows 7 operating system. It is used to gather system statistics, monitor system health, and manage system components. To work properly, WMI relies on the WMI service. This service must be running and properly configured for your environment.

You control the configuration of the WMI service through WMI Control, which can be accessed on a local or remote system by using the following steps:

1. Click Start, type administrative tools, and hit Enter.

2. Then click Computer Management.

3. To connect to a remote computer, right-click Computer Management in the console tree and then select Connect To Another Computer. You can now choose the system that has the services you want to manage, provided you have the proper administrative privileges. More »

Occasionally, you might discover a client that isn’t automatically installing updates correctly. Such clients are typically identified during software update audits. To identify the source of the problem, follow these steps:

1. Determine the last time the client was updated. This can be done in two different ways—by checking the client’s registry (the most reliable technique) or, if you use Windows Server Update Services (WSUS), by checking the Reports page on the WSUS Web site.

* To check the client’s registry, open the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\WindowsUpdate\Auto Update\Results registry key. In each of the Detect, Download, and Install subkeys, examine the LastSuccessTime entry to determine when updates were last detected, downloaded, and installed. More »