1. Ten Cool Things You Get In Windows 7 Than Mac OS X

2. Manage iPhone’s SpringBoard Icons on Ubuntu

3. Fix Windows 7 Intel AHCI Driver Failed Install

4. Consider Replacing Your Battery” Error Messages

5. Registry Tweaks to Enhance Your Windows XPerience – Part 13

6. Four free programs to help control Windows 7

7. Top10 – December 2010 Popular Tips

8. Ten keyboard shortcuts everyone should know

9. Free Windows 7 from Microsoft

10. 2010 Year Popular Tips – Top10

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The following tutorial will teach you how to fix the “acer-wmi: unable to detect available WMID devices” error on Ubuntu Netbook Remix and other netbook operating systems based on Ubuntu.
The error appears on various (if not all) netbooks made by Acer, such as Acer Aspire One or Acer eMachines, after a recent system update.

We’ve tested this bug with the Easy Peasy 1.6 and Ubuntu Netbook Remix 10.04 LTS (Lucid Lynx) operating systems. After the installation there are no issues and everything runs smoothly. But, if the user updates the machine, after a reboot, the above issue will appear.

The “acer-wmi: unable to detect available WMID devices” error is very annoying because it will also break your boot splash screen. So, if you are one of those who instead of looking at a nice splash screen while your netbook boots Ubuntu, get the “acer-wmi: unable to detect available WMID devices” error, follow the next steps to fix it. More »

The following tutorial will teach GNOME, Ubuntu, and other Linux users how to manage the icons (SpringBoard) on their Apple iPhone 3G, 3Gs, or iPhone 4 devices. The tutorial was tested with an iPhone 3Gs phone, on the Ubuntu 10.10 (Maverick Meerkat) operating system.

As you all probably already know, iPhone devices are supported in Linux distributions, such as Ubuntu 10.04 (Lucid Lynx) or Ubuntu 10.10 (Maverick Meerkat), all thanks to an amazing library called libimobiledevice.

The SpringBoard is the screen where all of your installed applications are displayed. You can easily rearrange the icons on your iPhone device if you hold your finger on an icon, for a few seconds, until they start jiggle. More »

It is actually a known fact that there is an issue with VirtualBox and the attached USB devices that many of us are trying to use in the virtual machine. Here is a real-life example:

I am a 100% Linux user and I have a photo printer that Linux can’t recognize. Let’s say that I want to print some photos quickly, to give them to someone. I have a Windows installation in a virtual machine just for this reason (sad, I know) and I want to access my printer, which is connected via a USB port. To my surprise, I can see the printer in the USB device list of VirtualBox, but I can’t access it (very frustrating). Firing up Firefox and searching on Google for a fix takes too long, because there are many old tutorials that teach you how to modify various files or change permissions, etc. What to do? Well, below is the answer to the endless VirtualBox – USB issue (and it’s pretty damn simple too!).

This tutorial was created mostly for my needs, but I am sure that many of you will find it very helpful. Ready? More »

Google introduced at the end of last week a new tool called GoogleCL. It runs from the command-line (yes, the Linux terminal), and allows users to post, create, list or delete photos from an existing Picasa account, videos from a YouTube account, edit, list or upload documents from your Google Docs account, add, delete or list events from Google Calendar or post on your Blogger weblog. These are just a few of the numerous functionalities of the new GoogleCL tool

Many of today’s computer users, the ones accustomed with graphical user interfaces, will not endorse the use of a command-line tool. Therefore, we’ve created this tutorial to show you a few real-life examples of how useful and simple this tool can be if you employ Google services on a daily basis. Please keep in mind that you must have an existing Google account (GMail e-mail address). More »