Even though there are many commercial and freeware download accelerators and managers available for Mac OS X, nothing beats the simplicity of a command line tool like wget. Mac OS X comes with a similar command-line tool called cURL, but for people who are from a Linux/UNIX background, wget would be the preferred tool.

Installing wget on Mac OS X involves compiling it from source. The first step to installing wget is downloading the source from one of the GNU FTP mirrors. You can get the latest version, or any previous version, if you prefer. The source usually comes in a .tar.gz, which you can easily extract by double clicking on the archive in Finder (the Mac OS X Archive Utility handles this).

To start the installation, open Terminal.app, and navigate to the source directory for wget (the one that was obtained by extracting the archive in the previous step), by using the following command: More »

It was approximately two years ago that Microsoft announced that customers running System Center would be able to leverage automated management across mixed source environments. It was at the Microsoft Management Summit (MMS) 2008 that Bob Muglia, senior vice president of the Server and Tools Business at Microsoft, revealed UNIX and Linux support in System Center.

Fast-forward a couple of years, and it appears that customers are asking about the Redmond company’s plans to support future releases of UNIX and Linux as they will be released, according to Robert Hearn, Sr. program manager Customer & Partner Community System Center Cross Platform & Interoperability.

“The cross platform integrations currently support the following operating systems: AIX 5.3 (Power), 6.1 (Power); HP-UX 11iv2 (PA-RISC and IA64), and 11iv3 (PA-RISC and IA64); Red Hat Enterprise Server 4 (x64 and x86) and 5 (x64 and x86); Solaris 8 (SPARC), 9 (SPARC), and 10 (SPARC and x86 versions later than 120012-14); and SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 9 (x86), 10.1 (x86 and x64) and 11,” Hearn noted. More »

Linux rarely needs to be rebooted. But when it does, it’s often slow to boot. Fortunately, there are ways to speed things up. Some of these methods are not terribly difficult. (although some, unfortunately, are). Let’s take a look.

1. Disable unnecessary services

Depending upon the use of the machine, plenty of services won’t be needed. Using Linux just for a desktop? Then you won’t need sendmail, httpd, and many other services. If your server is only a Web server, you can shut off many services as well. To do this, you can go to the Administration menu and take a look at the Services entry. Just deselect all of the services you don’t want to start.

2. Disable unnecessary kernel modules

If your desktop is wired to the Ethernet, you don’t need to have a wireless kernel module loaded. This task is a bit more difficult and will require a kernel recompilation, which is not the easiest task to undertake. To do this, you will need the kernel sources. Then, follow the standard steps for compiling a kernel. The difference is that you’re going to go through your system and disable all of the modules you don’t need. More »

Did you ever encountered any application or program which runs through command prompt only but does not work when you double click on it, this happens when you launch a program which is a console application. Instead when you try to launch it the command prompt window flashes for a second and closes automatically.

What is a Console Application?

A console application is a computer program designed to be used via a text-only computer interface, such as a text terminal, the command line interface of some operating systems (Unix, DOS, etc.) or the text-based interface included with some Graphical User Interface (GUI) operating systems, such as the Win32 console in Microsoft Windows

Console applications for windows could be some additional commands for windows which you may want to integrate with windows and some other programs which are completely console based or which does not have any GUI interface associated with them. More »

Need a quick reference card? Here you have a list you can choose from:

1.Linux Command Line Tips

This is a linux command line reference for common operations (HTML format).

2.Unix/Linux Reference Card

Linux Reference Card published on FOSSwire website by Jacob. (PDF format)

3.One Page LInux Manual

A summary of useful Linux command by Squadron. (PDF format)

4.Linux Security Quick Reference

The intent of this Quick Reference Guide is to provide a starting point for improving the security of your system, to serve as a pointer to more in-depth security information, and to increase security awareness and methods that can be used to improve security. (PDF format) More »