Microsoft shared details of workarounds that Windows users can implement to protect themselves against exploits targeting a new zero-day vulnerability which allows attackers to steal information from users.

The company confirmed reports of the newly discovered Windows security hole, as well as the fact that both published information and proof-of-concept code made their way into the wild.

According to the software giant, the flaw resides in the MHTML (MIME Encapsulation of Aggregate HTML). Applications such as Internet Explorer leverage MHTML to interpret MIME-formatted requests for content blocks within certain documents that need to be rendered. More »

Microsoft has confirmed a zero-day vulnerability affecting all supported versions of Internet Explorer, including IE8, IE7 and IE6.

The Redmond company explains that the security flaw involves the creation of uninitialized memory during a CSS function within the browser.

“It is possible under certain conditions for the memory to be leveraged by an attacker using a specially crafted Web page to gain remote code execution,” the software giant informed.

Given the fact that successful exploits against this vulnerability can allow for remote code execution, and attacker could potentially take over a victim’s computer.

However, Dave Forstrom, Director, Trustworthy Computing, Microsoft denied that this has happened yet. More »

Microsoft has wrapped up 2010 with a real bang as far as the volume of security vulnerabilities goes.

The company released no less than 17 security bulletins in December 2010, patching no less than 40 vulnerabilities.

However, just a couple of the patch packages are rated Critical, which means that the security holes they’re designed to plug can allow attackers to execute code remotely on a vulnerable computer and gain control over the machine.

The updates resolve security flaws in a range of products, including Office, Windows, Internet Explorer, SharePoint Server and Exchange.

Jerry Bryant, group manager, response communications, Microsoft was kind enough to provide a complete list with all the security bulletins issued by the software giant this month, which customers will be able to find below. More »

Or at least it will be in the next few days at the highly entertaining Black Hat Conference. This annual get together of security experts – on both sides of the fence – has become the place to reveal newly discovered computer and network loopholes and flaws. It’s usually to be followed by lots of nervous press releases from manufacturers and software companies, either promising fixes, or claiming the security issues are non-existent or irrelevant.

This one, reported by Engadget and uncovered by security researcher Craig Heffner, highlights a long-standing problem with wireless routers known as DNS Rebinding. Heffner developed a tool that managed to crack open more than half of the thirty routers it was tested on, including popular models from the likes of Belkin and Linksys. Internet and network traffic passing through hacked routers can be intercepted or redirected, potentially allowing remote access to files on a user’s computer. Although the full extent of this vulnerability has yet to be revealed Heffner says there’s a lot users can do to protect their routers. This includes changing the setup menu’s default password and IP address, which will help until the manufacturers come up with a more permanent solution.