As it does every month, Microsoft has built an ISO image packaging all the security updates it released for supported versions of the Windows client and server operating systems via its monthly patch cycle.

The latest release, namely the February 2010 Security Release ISO Image, brings to the table the Windows patches offered on February 9th through the Windows Update and Microsoft Update for Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2, but also older releases of the OS, such as Windows Vista and Windows XP.

Just a few days ago, the Redmond company released no less than 13 security bulletins patching a total of 26 vulnerabilities in Windows and Office. A total of 11 patch packages were designed to plug security holes in Windows. “As always, it is recommended that customers deploy all security updates as soon as possible.

Of the bulletins released this month, customers should prioritize and deploy MS10-006, MS10-007, MS10-008, MS10-013, and MS10-015, given Critical severity ratings and/or Exploitability Index ratings of 1 (‘Consistent Exploit Code Likely’),” Jerry Bryant, Sr. Security communications manager – lead, revealed. More »

The process of installing Windows 7 involves a stage in which end users need to Set a Network Location. The SNL dialog window can be revisited after deployment, and the settings altered. In this context, location is key. In order to simplify the network configuration, Windows 7, just as Windows Vista before it, allows users to set up a network connection in accordance to location. The SNL dialog offers three different network locations: Public, Work and Home. What it does is that when the computer detects a network connection, options are provided for the user to help define and apply appropriate network settings automatically.

User interaction is only necessary when choosing among Home, Work or Public locations, as Windows 7 does all the heavy lifting. But you can’t even tell there’s any heavy lifting involved as the configuration process is extremely fast, and I for example, have yet to see it fail even once, after countless installs of the platform in pre-Beta, Beta, RC and pre-RTM stages.

In all fairness, the Windows 7 client comes with an additional option for network location, namely Domain. However, Domain is reserved for enterprise environments and is out of the reach of end users. The option is controlled entirely by a network administrator, users cannot opt to take advantage of Domain by themselves or alter the configuration. More »

a) click Start and type ‘netplwiz’ or click that name on the Start menu
b) in the GUI window that comes up, uncheck the “Users must enter a username and password to use this computer” box
c) click ‘Apply’
d) in the new dialog box that opens type the name of the account you want to auto-logon by default (if the account is not normally passworded then it blank)
e) click OK and exit